Parsi Khabar https://parsikhabar.net Parsis: The Zoroastrians of India Pakistan and The World Tue, 22 Sep 2020 22:28:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://parsikhabar.net/wp-content/uploads/cropped-PKArtboard-1-32x32.png Parsi Khabar https://parsikhabar.net 32 32 In My Kitchen: Perzen Patel https://parsikhabar.net/food/in-my-kitchen-perzen-patel/24132/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=in-my-kitchen-perzen-patel https://parsikhabar.net/food/in-my-kitchen-perzen-patel/24132/#disqus_thread Tue, 22 Sep 2020 19:24:50 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24132 Our dear friend and amazing chef, entrepreneur and now Kiwi Podcaster Perzen Patel a.k.a Bawi Bride featured in Eat Well New Zealand Perzen is happiest when she is at the intersection of cooking food, eating and telling a good story. When she’s not working, she is shining a light on New Zealand’s diverse food scene […]]]>

Our dear friend and amazing chef, entrepreneur and now Kiwi Podcaster Perzen Patel a.k.a Bawi Bride featured in Eat Well New Zealand

Perzen is happiest when she is at the intersection of cooking food, eating and telling a good story. When she’s not working, she is shining a light on New Zealand’s diverse food scene through her podcast, Kiwi Foodcast and, thanks to the support of Panuku’s The Kitchen Project, Perzen has been working on the launch of her latest venture Dolly Mumma. Named for her grandmother, it’s a range of ready-to-cook pastes based on family recipes handed down through generations. Here Perzen shares her at-home kitchen essentials with Eat Well.

Chef_Perzen_Patel_1

My kitchen at home is… the place you will always find me. It is my happy space and I am always experimenting with a new recipe or ingredient or cooking in bulk so that my three boys have enough for the week. My one pet peeve is an unorganised pantry so I’m always going on to my family about putting things back where they found it because I can’t cook if my pantry is a mess.

If I could change anything… I would have a bigger kitchen with more counter space and buy a deep freezer. I love to meal plan and cook things in bulk so it would be great to have more freezer space so I don’t have to worry about not having enough meals.

Items that are always in my fridge are… curry leaves and coriander because they are my go-to herbs for just about any kind of food I make. I always have a stock of carrots because I hide them in all the meals I make for my kids and broccoli because my son likes to open the fridge and nibble on it raw. Aside from that, there’s always cheese. We are a cheese loving family.

My pantry is full of… all kinds of sauces and spices. I have storage baskets for different kinds of cuisine so my south-east Asian ingredients like fish sauce, oyster sauce etc stay there and I have another basket for all my pastas and couscous and then shelves for my Indian spices. Now that I have a Thermomix at home I also make sauces and spice blends myself at home. I do that when the mood gets me once in a couple of months and that leaves me with plenty of flavours I can experiment with.

My favourite ingredient to cook with is… onions. I often find myself cutting a couple before I have decided what I am cooking and they are just so versatile and tasty!

My go-to meal is… a bowl of dahl. I love lentils and could have them every night of the week, making different kinds of preparations using them. Being Parsi, my favourite is Dhandar, a simple preparation made using yellow split peas, ghee, turmeric, garlic and cumin. If I’ve been away travelling for a long time or if I am happy or if I am upset, Dhandar is soul food.

I cook at home… pretty much every day. While I used to love dining out, going out for a meal with small kids if often a big mission. During lockdown I experimented making most of the takeaways I love to eat at home. Now that I know how to make a good steak and pulled pork I can’t imagine going out and paying a lot for it.

My most-used appliance is… hands down my Thermomix. I use it for milling spices, making coconut milk at home, making soups, kneading bread dough and to make the most delicious desserts.

My least used is… my stovetop. I make most of my food in the Thermomix or the oven and when I am not using either one of those it’s my deep fryer I love.

A kitchen gadget everyone should own is… a really good oven. Or maybe even two! We have a 1.5 oven in our kitchen and I often have something cooking on all levels.

A spice I can’t live without is… a blend of cumin and coriander seeds. I love putting it in everything; it adds a lovely flavour even in European or Italian food I make at home. Another discovery though not technically a spice is Worcestershire sauce. When I taste a dish and feel like its missing something but I can’t put my finger on it I generally add both of these ingredients and it always does the job.

My advice for living well is… to make time for the things you love. Whether that is cooking, writing or in this tired mum’s case, taking a nap!

Try Perzen’s recipe for Traditional Dahl.

Follow Perzen Patel on Instagram @perzenpatel and her new project on Instagram @dollymummanz, her award-winning food blog at http://www.bawibride.com/ or tune into her podcast Kiwi Foodcast.

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India’s Parsi Community and the Making of Modern Iran: An Interview with Afshin Marashi https://parsikhabar.net/books/indias-parsi-community-and-the-making-of-modern-iran-an-interview-with-afshin-marashi/24160/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=indias-parsi-community-and-the-making-of-modern-iran-an-interview-with-afshin-marashi https://parsikhabar.net/books/indias-parsi-community-and-the-making-of-modern-iran-an-interview-with-afshin-marashi/24160/#disqus_thread Tue, 22 Sep 2020 18:35:00 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24160 Afshin Marashi is Professor and Farzaneh Family Chair in Modern Iranian History at the University of Oklahoma, where from 2011 to 2020 he also served as the founding director of the Farzaneh Family Center for Iranian and Persian Gulf Studies. He is the author most recently of Exile and the Nation: The Parsi Community of […]]]>

Afshin Marashi is Professor and Farzaneh Family Chair in Modern Iranian History at the University of Oklahoma, where from 2011 to 2020 he also served as the founding director of the Farzaneh Family Center for Iranian and Persian Gulf Studies. He is the author most recently of Exile and the Nation: The Parsi Community of India and the Making of Modern Iran (University of Texas Press, 2020). His previous books include Nationalizing Iran: Culture, Power, and the State, 1870-1940 (University of Washington Press, 2008), and the volume (co-edited with Kamran Aghaie) Rethinking Iranian Nationalism and Modernity (University of Texas Press, 2014).

Your new book, Exile and the Nation: The Parsi Community of India and the Making of Modern Iran, is an exciting transnational history of the 20th century. The book has it all, from murder mystery to poetry to philanthropy and more. Can you tell us about it?

Graphic depicting Parsi dreams of return to Iran, published in Iran League Quarterly. Source: ILQ, NYPL.

What I’ve tried to do with this book is to add a new layer of complexity to the history of modern Iranian nationalism. Among the most ubiquitous themes of 20th century Iranian culture are the themes of neo-classicism and the renewal of interest in Iran’s Zoroastrian heritage. In Exile and the Nation, I’ve historicized the process by which this took shape, but instead of looking at state-led projects, or the influence of European ideas of nationalism, I’ve looked to the cultural and intellectual encounter with India’s Zoroastrian community to explain how these ideas evolved.

The book argues that the reciprocal encounter between the Parsi community of India — especially those in the city of Bombay (or Mumbai) — and the community of modern Iranian intellectuals was key to this history. The Parsis had mostly emigrated to South Asia in the medieval period. By the 19th century they had become a prosperous minority in the context of India’s British colonial history. It was in this period that they began a series of philanthropic and quasi-missionary efforts to reach out to Iran, to both re-connect with the remaining Zoroastrian communities inside Iran, and to establish reciprocal exchanges with Iranian intellectuals. 

Most of the book focuses on the 1920s and 1930s, which is the period that represents the high-point of this exchange between the Parsis and the Iranians, although the roots do go back earlier. Bombay-based Parsi civic organizations facilitated much of this exchange, in particular an organization known as the Iran League (established in 1922). They were involved in multiple philanthropic efforts, including building schools, hospitals, and orphanages in Kerman, Yazd, and Tehran. They also published an important bi-lingual English and Persian journal, the Iran League Quarterly documenting their efforts.

clip_image007Aims and Objectives of the Iran League, Bombay, published in Iran League Quarterly. Source: ILQ, NYPL.

You mentioned the “murder mystery” element that’s part of chapter 1, which is a good way of describing that chapter. There’s perhaps a film noir element as well. When I was a student, my favorite works of history were always books that were conceptually sophisticated yet readable. Nikki Keddie’s (my PhD advisor) al-Afghani biography worked that way, as did Albert Hourani’s Arabic Thought in the Liberal Age, and Eric Hobsbawm’s Age of Empire. These are some of the key texts that shaped my approach to thinking and writing. The source material that I found for the book was extremely rich, and so I’ve tried to write Exile and the Nation in a way that is both conceptually sophisticated, while also being engaged in an imaginative — or perhaps cinematic —  exercise that paints a vivid portrait of the Parsi-Iranian exchange. Hopefully it makes the book readable.

For those familiar with your research, we know that you have had an interest in bookshops and the movement of books. How did that interest play into the making of your own book, Exile and the Nation?

One of the ways that the pre-Islamic revival grew inside Iran was through the production and circulation of a new genre of books published by the Parsis in India. Part of what I’ve tried to do in this book, and in my 2015 IJMES article about the history of bookstores in Tehran, is to develop a way of doing intellectual history that is more than just a history of ideas. Ideas are more than disembodied abstractions, they have a material history that is contained in books. Tracing the movement of books is one way of thinking about ideas as part of the social worlds where they circulate. 

As I was doing the research for this book, I quickly learned that the books published by the Parsis in Bombay were making their way to specific bookstores in Tehran. The books themselves tell us, not only who the publishers were, but often tell us where they were sold. This led me to see if I could figure out who owned these bookstores, where they were located, what their history was, and who the customers were. I was surprised how much of this I was able to map. Nile Green’s Bombay Islam has a chapter about Bombay-based Persian-language publishers who produced books for export, and my interest began there, but I wanted to figure out what happened to these books once they made their way to Iran. It became sort of a research scavenger hunt. The short answer is that they migrated to the bookstores inside Iran, and were read by a new social strata of Iranian readers. In this way, my IJMES article can be read as an appendix to Exile and the Nation.

Detail of Iran-e Bastan masthead. Source: IISH.
  1. I love how you emphasize the importance of the movement and mobility of people as well. Could you talk a little bit about the mythical importance of migration versus the zigzagging between Iran and India in the 19th and 20th centuries?

There’s at least two things to say about that. First, all of the characters whose lives I document in Exile and the Nation travelled extensively during the course of their lives. This was made possible by new technologies of mobility, especially steamships within the Indian Ocean world. By the 1920s and 30s, it was relatively easy to travel by steamer between Bombay or Karachi and the Persian Gulf ports of Bushehr, Khorramshahr, Basrah, and the newly built port of Bandar Shahpur. Road and rail construction were also central to new possibilities of mobility. Of course there had always been a history of mobility between Iran and South Asia, but by the interwar period it became much easier. For Parsis, the new possibilities of mobility even spurred a new culture of “heritage tourism” to visit Iranian archaeological sites. There is actually a whole history of tourism that needs to be written in the field of Iranian studies.

The second point to make about mobility is that the kind of travel that I’m describing is very modern, not only in terms of its modalities, but also in terms of how the experience of displacement and connection were understood. You can’t really experience the modern notion of “exile” without first understanding the idea of a national homeland. The mythical idea of a medieval Parsi exodus to India only begins to take shape as Parsis begin to think about their history through a modern lens. Even the 16th century text Qesseh-ye Sanjan, which is a poetic rendering of the Parsi exodus from Iran to India, was likely understood in a very different way when it was written than how it was later understood in the 19th and 20th centuries. Alan Williams has made this argument. So we should distinguish between the experience of mobility and migration as it was understood in the pre-modern period, from the way those modalities of travel were experienced in the modern-national age. Both produced forms of meaning, but they were of different types.

Advertisement for Steamship journey to Iran, Iran League Quarterly. Source: ILQ, NYPL.

Each of the chapters is centered around a person. As a historian, I find that I sometimes develop relationships with the people in my research, and it was very sweet for me to see how each of these people – Kaykhosrow Shahrokh, Dinshah Irani, Rabindranath Tagore, Ebrahim Purdavud, and Abdulrahman Saif Azad – anchored your book in their own way. How did you come to pick these people as the stars of your book?

Ebrahim Purdavud (1886-1968) during one of his research trips to Bombay, 1935. Source: ILQ, NYPL.

The short answer is that there was a mixture of considerations, some of them historical, and some of them practical. I wanted to select figures who were key to the history that I’m studying. The biographical approach is sometimes criticized, but I think if it’s done well it can be illuminating. I’ve tried not to focus exclusively on the interiority of the subjects, but on how their lives intersected with one another and with the social worlds that they inhabited.

I also selected the central figures to help make the book’s central argument, which is that the Parsi-Iranian exchange produced a wide range of possibilities for Iranian nationalism, from a liberal-ecumenical form to a more exclusionary and right-wing variety. The lives that I document in the book illustrate this idea, and might help us to reconsider some of the alternative histories of Iranian nationalism that have perhaps been forgotten. I think uncovering this history might also have implications, not only for Iran’s past, but for Iran’s future as well.

At the same time, I’m reading through the chapters and I’m thinking, where are the women! We hear about Madame Cama, a few aunts and other women – could you tell us a little more how they fit into the Parsi community activism and transnational ties to Iran?

Zoroastrian school for girls in Yazd, with teachers, students, and Parsi philanthropist, Peshotanji D. Marker (1871-1965), second row, center. Source: ILQ, NYPL.
Ratanbanu Bamji Tata (d. 1930), principal benefactor of Anushirvan
School for Girls in Tehran. Source: ILQ, NYPL.

If there is one thing that I hope grows out of this book, it’s that the book will inspire a fuller reconsideration of Madame Bhikaiji Rustom Cama. She was a central figure, not only in the Parsi-Iranian exchange, but also in the broader history of a “proto-Third Worldism” that took shape during the early decades of the 20th century. She hailed from a prominent Parsi family, was a leading anti-colonial activist in London and Paris, and was remarkably successful in building coalitions between different expat groups in Europe, including Indians, Iranians, Arabs, Russians, Germans, Irish, Turks, as well as Marxists and anarchists. Nawaz Mody has published an important article about the life of Madame Cama, but there’s not much else. In Exile and the Nation she plays a key role as the person who politicized Ebrahim Purdavud, and is probably the first Parsi that he ever met, in Paris, sometime around 1910. She was a remarkable figure, but she was also somewhat exceptional, since the political and intellectual histories of both Parsi nationalism and Iranian nationalism were steeped in patriarchy during that period.

There are other important women in the book as well. Armen Ohanian, the Armenian-Iranian writer and actress, and pioneer in modern Middle Eastern queer culture, also makes an appearance. She lived a fascinatingly transnational life that also intersected with the community of Iranians in Paris in the years before WWI. Like Madame Cama, Armen Ohanian’s life also deserves further study. You mentioned “the aunts,” these were relatives of Kaykhosrow Shahrokh who had migrated to India in the mid-19th century, married into prominent Parsi families, and encouraged Parsi philanthropy towards Iran. They helped their nephew to make his way to Bombay for his education. There are numerous other examples of this as well. The other key female figure is Ratanbanu Bamji Tata. She was from the family that owned one of the most successful industrial firms in colonial India, and she was responsible for providing the financial resources to build the famous Anushiravan School for Girls in Tehran. This and other similar schools helped to produce a new generation of women who became part of an emerging Iranian middle class. There’s a whole transnational history of Parsi-Iranian gender activism that certainly deserves a more detailed study than what I’ve been able to provide in this book.

Kaykhosrow Shahrokh (1874-1940), President of Zoroastrian Anjoman of Tehran, Majles Deputy, and his family. Source: Iran Nameh.
  1. So much of the scholarship on Iranian nationalism is linked to the Persian language. Many of your principal characters wrote either treatises on religious texts, poetry, translations, and more in multiple different languages. How does a transnational lens shed light on how languages take on multiple valences?
Nameh-ye Iran-e Bastan, published by Abdulrahman Saif Azad in Tehran, 1933-
Source: IISH.

Iranian history does not solely exist within the linguistic purview of Persian. In the case of the Parsis, it’s Gujarati that is the most important language for understanding Parsi history, not Persian. I haven’t used Gujarati sources for this book, because the field of Iranian studies doesn’t really encourage someone to pursue knowledge of a language like Gujarati. I’m glad that this now seems to be changing, and a scholar like Dan Sheffield at Princeton is exceptional as a person who uses both Persian and Gujarati sources.

We can say the same about Urdu, which as a “South Asian Studies” language is not a language that we in Iranian studies have been generally encouraged to pursue. My colleague at the University of Oklahoma, Alexander Jabbari, is working on a book manuscript that explores the intersections between Persian and Urdu. Mana Kia’s new book, Persianate Selves, also questions the geographies of Persian. These examples shouldn’t be the exceptions. The intersection of the Persian and Russian linguistic worlds is another area that needs further study.

You mentioned translation, which I also consider in Exile and the Nation. As with books as material objects, we can also understand the circulation of ideas by tracing their movement through languages. But translation isn’t simply about the “transmission” of an idea from one language to another, translation also affects the possibilities of meanings that those ideas can express. For example, Ebrahim Purdavud’s New Persian translations of the Avesta not only made the Zoroastrian texts knowable to modern Iranians, but those translations rendered those texts into the poetic idiom of the Persianate literary tradition. I’ve tried to touch on this in the book, but there’s much more that needs to be figured out. As I try to argue in the book, Iranian intellectual history is not simply about orientalist discourse dominating Iranian intellectuals. The history of translation in a transnational context might help us to see something else going on, something more productive and creative, and maybe more interesting.

Iran League Quarterly (ILQ) masthead, Parsi journal published in Bombay. Source: ILQ, NYPL.

Reading your book about how these diasporic populations fostered such strong ties to Iran in the early 20th century was interesting to read from my own vantage point, as an Iranian-American from a different diasporic center, Tehrangeles. Do you see parallels between these diasporic centers, Los Angeles and Mumbai?

Exile and the Nation might be an allegory for Tehrangeles. Like you, I grew up in Los Angeles, in the San Fernando Valley (or “Valley-abad” as we call it). The more I learned about the Parsis, the more familiar their story appeared to me. The Parsis developed a diaspora culture shaped by a memory of displacement. Iranians in Los Angeles have similarly produced displaced Iranian cultural spaces within Los Angeles. It might seem strange to say, but contemporary multicultural Los Angeles is not unlike polyglot Bombay of a century ago.

You can see this in places like bookstores, food markets, and restaurants. I remember as an adolescent going to Sherkat-e Ketab on Westwood Boulevard, the most famous bookstore in Tehrangeles (which sadly closed down a couple of years ago). I also spent a lot of time there in the 90s, when I was a graduate student at UCLA. Whenever I would walk into that bookstore I always felt like I was walking into a cultural space that was defined by a certain version of displaced Iranianness. As a young person it was strange and intimidating, but I remember asking myself: How did all of these books get here? The origins of Exile and the Nation probably goes back to trying to answer that question. I had a similar feeling of displaced Iranianness when years later I sat in one of the “Irani cafés” in Mumbai. The Iranians in LA are probably becoming more and more like the Parsis of a century ago. I think that might be a useful idea for readers to keep in mind while reading the book.

Rabindranath Tagore in Tehran, 1932, with members of the Iranian Literary Society. Source: Dinshah Irani Memorial Volume.

Exile and the Nation is a trailblazing book in Iranian studies. Much of the transnational studies in modern Iranian studies look to “the West,” but you looked east to India. What are your thoughts on the evolution of the field of modern Iranian studies?

Madame Cama (1861-1936) at the Stuttgart Congress of the Second
International, 1907. Source: IISH.

I think we are at a critical moment in the evolution of Iranian studies. There has definitely been a turn towards “the global” in the broader field of historical research, and we are seeing this take root in Iranian studies as well. Part of what this means is that approaches shaped by national history and narrowly defined area studies are being replaced by new ways of finding connections between histories. In modern historiography, the narrow focus on European influence has also obscured the history of South-South connections that are still quite unexamined for the modern period.

What I’ve tried to do with Exile and the Nation is to reconfigure the history of Iranian nationalism as a movement that emerged from a much more complex set of entanglements stemming from the Indian Ocean world, the decline of the early modern Persianate system, and the empowerment of a new Parsi-centered understanding of Iranian history and culture. I’ve tried to approach the subject in a way that is both trans-regional (with South Asian Studies) and trans-temporal (with early modern history). Once we move beyond the limiting frameworks of national history, area studies, and Eurocentric histories, an entire world of new research possibilities opens up. Exile and the Nation is just one example of this new approach to the field. Houri Berberian’s Roving Revolutionaries, and Arash Khazeni’s, Talinn Grigor’s, and James Pickett’s forthcoming books are other examples of this in the modern field. There are some exciting dissertations in the works as well. The field needs more voices and more perspectives. We have so much work left to do, so much to think about, and so much history yet to write. I’m eager to see what comes next.

About the Author: Beeta Baghoolizadeh

Beeta Baghoolizadeh (PhD, History, University of Pennsylvania) is an Assistant Professor of History and Africana Studies at Bucknell University. Her research focuses on the moving boundaries and changing constructions of race in 19th and 20th century Iran. She is is also the illustrator of the graphic series “Diaspora Letters,” a multimedia project that explores memory and migration in the Iranian diaspora.

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Dr. Hoshedar P. Tamboli Voted Top Cardiologist 2020 by Florida Magazine https://parsikhabar.net/medicine/dr-hoshedar-p-tamboli-voted-top-cardiologist-2020-by-florida-magazine/24129/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dr-hoshedar-p-tamboli-voted-top-cardiologist-2020-by-florida-magazine https://parsikhabar.net/medicine/dr-hoshedar-p-tamboli-voted-top-cardiologist-2020-by-florida-magazine/24129/#disqus_thread Wed, 16 Sep 2020 20:12:47 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24129 Heart Vascular and Vein of Tampa Bay proudly announces that Dr. Hoshedar Tamboli will be joining the practice, starting Aug. 31, 2020. Dr. Tamboli has been in the practice of interventional and consultative cardiology in Tampa for 28 years. Recently, he was awarded “Top Cardiologist 2020” in the area by Florida Magazine on the recommendation […]]]>

Heart Vascular and Vein of Tampa Bay proudly announces that Dr. Hoshedar Tamboli will be joining the practice, starting Aug. 31, 2020. Dr. Tamboli has been in the practice of interventional and consultative cardiology in Tampa for 28 years. Recently, he was awarded “Top Cardiologist 2020” in the area by Florida Magazine on the recommendation of patients and his peers.

hoshedar-tamboliHe was involved with the very first coronary stent placed in Tampa (1993) and was a national proctor teaching other cardiologists countrywide the same techniques. Thereafter, he was involved as Primary investigator in a series of stent design trials. He also performed the first procedure in the Tampa Bay Area to open a clogged heart stent with radiation delivered into the stent in the heart.

Over the years, he pioneered peripheral interventions in the cardiac catheterization labs in Tampa and introduced many endovascular techniques in the county including Fox Hollow atherectomy to remove plaque from clogged arteries in the legs. In 2003, he placed the very first drug-eluting stent in Hillsborough county. These are the stents which are now almost exclusively used in the heart. Additionally, Dr. Tamboli has been Chairman of the Cardiology Departments of Advent Hospital in Tampa as well as of Brandon Regional Hospital. In addition to treating complex coronary artery disease and endovascular procedures, including in the carotid arteries that go to the brain and aortic aneurysms in the catheterization lab, he also performs office-based vein clinic procedures like vein ablation and varicose vein treatment.

Prior to coming to Tampa, Dr. Tamboli was Director of Interventional Cardiology at Marshall University in West Virginia and Assistant Professor of Medicine. Since then, he has also been appointed Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of South Florida in Tampa. He enjoys mentoring young medical students and physicians. In addition, he is involved with many local charitable organizations.

At HVVTB, he will be in charge of developing a multifaceted cardiology, vascular and vein team to serve the local communities as well as the hospitals in those communities with cutting edge technology.

Dr. Tamboli, beyond his academic accomplishments and procedural skill, is known for giving individual personal care to his patients. He calls this philosophy “Patient First Always”.

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WZO Sanatorium at Sanjan Opens https://parsikhabar.net/news/wzo-sanatorium-at-sanjan-opens/24126/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wzo-sanatorium-at-sanjan-opens https://parsikhabar.net/news/wzo-sanatorium-at-sanjan-opens/24126/#disqus_thread Wed, 16 Sep 2020 17:24:54 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24126 We are pleased to inform Patrons that the Sanatorium will become operational from October 01, 2020 onwards. The facility will be completely sanitized before it makes Guests welcome. Keeping in mind the good health of Guests and Sanatorium Staff, use of our facilities will be made available on the following conditions to be adhered to […]]]>

We are pleased to inform Patrons that the Sanatorium will become operational from October 01, 2020 onwards.

The facility will be completely sanitized before it makes Guests welcome.

sanjan-jj

Keeping in mind the good health of Guests and Sanatorium Staff, use of our facilities will be made available on the following conditions to be adhered to by all Guests:

1. In view of the current global pandemic, Guests wishing to use the Sanatorium should visit only if they are not suffering from symptoms associated with the Novel Corona Virus – Covid – 19.

2. Guests confirm they have visited the Sanatorium of their own volition and absolve Trustees and Staff of The WZO Trust Funds from any financial or medical responsibility or liability.

3. Guests will have to wear protective masks and maintain social distancing in all the common areas of the Sanatorium.

4. Guests will subject themselves to oximeter and infra red thermometer temperature reading every morning that will be taken by the Manager. In the event that the oxygen reading of any guest is found to be below 90 and temperature above 100.4 F, they will be asked to immediately leave the Sanatorium. A record of the oximeter and temperature readings of Guests will be maintained during their stay at the Sanatorium.

5. Till further notice, the maximum number of Guests permitted in each room will be not more than 3 (three), and maximum number of total Guests in the sanatorium will not be more than 15 (fifteen).

These Conditions and Rules have been framed keeping in mind, maintaining the good health of Guests as well as our Staff and all are advised to diligently comply with the same.

Guests wishing to use the facility from October 01, 2020 onwards may contact the Manager of the Sanatorium on either of the telephone numbers mentioned above.

Yazdi K. Randelia;

CEO,

The WZO Trust Funds.

THE WZO TRUST FUNDS

BAI MANECKBAI P. B. JEEJEEBHOY SANATORIUM

SANJAN

Tel: +91 (0260) 2575018; +91 97259 44407

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XYZ Whacky Weekend Comes to North East USA and Canada https://parsikhabar.net/diaspora/xyz-whacky-weekend-comes-to-north-east-usa-and-canada/24123/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=xyz-whacky-weekend-comes-to-north-east-usa-and-canada https://parsikhabar.net/diaspora/xyz-whacky-weekend-comes-to-north-east-usa-and-canada/24123/#disqus_thread Wed, 16 Sep 2020 17:13:37 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24123 Our dear friends at XYZ Foundation are collaborating with FEZANA Member Associations to create the hugely popular XYZ Whacky Weekend for youth in North America. The first weekend is planned for those on the Eastern timezone in USA and Canada. There are only a few slots open, so if you have not yet registerd, now […]]]>

Our dear friends at XYZ Foundation are collaborating with FEZANA Member Associations to create the hugely popular XYZ Whacky Weekend for youth in North America.

The first weekend is planned for those on the Eastern timezone in USA and Canada.

There are only a few slots open, so if you have not yet registerd, now is the time.

A future event for Pacific Coast timezone is also being planned. Stay tuned for those dates.

XYZ WHACKY WEEKEND

Especially for North America (EAST COAST)

Xtremely Young Zoroastrians are an organisation based in Mumbai, India who have activities for children aged 5 to 15 years.

XYZ has planned this weekend which will be a great opportunity for you to meet new people, make some amazing friends and have lots of fun, absolutely FREE OF COST…

Some of our activities include Bingo, Scavenger Hunt, Art, Creativity and Games, all with a unique and fun twist.

All you have to do is log into Zoom from your own homes and have lots of fun!
 
To register, click on the link: https://bit.ly/XYZWW

Last Date to Register: Wednesday, 23rd September 2020.

Or email us on info@xyzfoundation.net

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Dolly Dastoor: On her 80th birthday, she’s the one giving a gift https://parsikhabar.net/individuals/dolly-dastoor-on-her-80th-birthday-shes-the-one-giving-a-gift/24120/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dolly-dastoor-on-her-80th-birthday-shes-the-one-giving-a-gift https://parsikhabar.net/individuals/dolly-dastoor-on-her-80th-birthday-shes-the-one-giving-a-gift/24120/#disqus_thread Mon, 14 Sep 2020 23:28:51 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24120 We are thrilled to share this article about our amazing friend, philosopher, mentor and guide Dr. Dolly Dastoor. Truly one of a kind. Dr. Dolly Dastoor’s contribution to the field of dementia care has been generous. During her decades as a clinical psychologist, she developed a now-standard assessment tool, brought innovative and compassionate design to […]]]>

We are thrilled to share this article about our amazing friend, philosopher, mentor and guide Dr. Dolly Dastoor. Truly one of a kind.

Dr. Dolly Dastoor’s contribution to the field of dementia care has been generous. During her decades as a clinical psychologist, she developed a now-standard assessment tool, brought innovative and compassionate design to patient care, and introduced the support group concept to Montrealers living with Alzheimer’s. Her generosity has also spread to her religious community: she funded a scholarship and holds a longtime editor position for a Zoroastrian journal. Her generosity has now touched McGill, with the creation of a scholarship in her name that combines dementia research with physical and occupational therapy.

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The Dolly Dastoor Research Award was established this year by Dastoor and family, on the occasion of her 80th birthday, to support a graduate student enrolled in the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy (SPOT). The award seeks out students who are conducting research in rehabilitation science, with a particular focus on dementia care.

Dastoor is now retired from her positions as Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, Co-Director of the Program for Dementia with Psychiatric Co-Morbidity in the Moe Levin Centre at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and member of the McGill Centre for Studies in Aging. Her thinking behind applying physical and occupational therapy to dementia care comes from seeing the constant introduction of new pharmacological treatments (which she says are too often unsuccessful) and an insufficient focus on keeping patients at home as long as possible.

“When a new molecule would come up, I would always say ‘But what about people who are with me? How am I going to treat them? I don’t need drugs for them. I need new techniques,’” says Dastoor, who saw many treatment innovations coming from engineers and architects.

It was, in fact, the architect Dr. John Zeisel who she says helped bring about a “paradigm shift” in the early 2000s, with the opening of the Moe Levin Centre. The day centre, memory clinic and temporary overnight facilities at the Douglas were designed to treat dementia patients with respect, she says. “Each patient had a separate room with a separate bathroom. They were not wearing hospital clothes. In addition to hospital food, staff and patients would prepare some cakes and biscuits, bringing memories and giving an aroma of home-baked food. The whole place was designed as a home, with all sorts of furniture.” Families of dementia patients coveted the centre, and staff delighted in working there long-term.

Innovation and a sense of humanity have been the themes in Dastoor’s career. Born in India, she spent the first 10 years of her career in Nigeria working on projects for both the World Health Organization and the Rockefeller Foundation. One of those projects had her comparing the treatment of schizophrenics by traditional healers in their villages with those being looked after by doctors in hospitals. The outcomes were similar. “In the villages, they would adopt the person with the disease and treat them as family. They just brought them into the fold.”

In 1973, Dastoor arrived in Canada and joined the Douglas as a research fellow in geriatrics, and was later hired as a clinical psychologist. In working on various pharmacological research projects, she got involved with the families of patients. One thing she noticed was a need for them to compare notes with one another on how to cope with managing their loved ones’ home care. That led to the formation of the Alzheimer Society of Montreal and the its first support group, along with a manual on how to organize and what to teach in such groups.

Much of her scientific work has revolved around assessment. She and geriatric psychiatrist and psychiatry professor Martin Cole, BSc’68, MDCM’72, developed the Hierarchic Dementia Scale for Assessment and Prognosis of Dementia. The test measures the loss over time of various cognitive and physical functions and is a dementia assessment tool widely used by physicians to this day.

Dastoor, wearing a McGill sweatshirt on the day of the interview at her South Shore home, says she set up the scholarship fund after a suggestion last year from her son Zubin, BEng’91. She agreed with him to leave a legacy for her at McGill, and for the many alumni in her family, namely son Farahad (BSc’88), daughter Natasha (MDCM’96), and daughter-in-law and SPOT alumna Jasmine (MSc’92), as well as grandson Jehan (pictured above), currently attending.

She is still active in the field of dementia care, giving public talks on memory and successful aging, as well as talking to caregivers on stressors and how to manage them.

The reflex to give has always been part of her family. She remembers cleaning out her late parents’ house and finding so many donation receipts. “Our faith teaches us to give back,” says Dastoor.

To the woman who has been giving her whole life, the very least we can do now is give to her a very happy 80th birthday wish.

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8th World Zoroastrian Youth Congress 2023: London is calling! Spotlight on Youth Organisers https://parsikhabar.net/8wzyc/8th-world-zoroastrian-youth-congress-2023-london-is-calling-spotlight-on-youth-organisers/24116/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=8th-world-zoroastrian-youth-congress-2023-london-is-calling-spotlight-on-youth-organisers https://parsikhabar.net/8wzyc/8th-world-zoroastrian-youth-congress-2023-london-is-calling-spotlight-on-youth-organisers/24116/#disqus_thread Fri, 11 Sep 2020 23:41:12 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24116 With the 8th World Zoroastrian Youth Congress (8WZYC) 2023 being hosted by the Zoroastrian Trust Funds of Europe (ZTFE) in the United Kingdom (UK) in Summer 2023, a dedicated team of youth volunteers have already commenced early groundwork to start planning and organising this momentous event. As part of a series of articles, we will […]]]>

With the 8th World Zoroastrian Youth Congress (8WZYC) 2023 being hosted by the Zoroastrian Trust Funds of Europe (ZTFE) in the United Kingdom (UK) in Summer 2023, a dedicated team of youth volunteers have already commenced early groundwork to start planning and organising this momentous event. As part of a series of articles, we will be sharing the insights and visions of our 8WZYC organising team.

Article by Shazneen Munshi, Venue Coordinator, 8WZYC

For those of you who may not know me, my name is Shazneen Munshi. Having graduated with a Law LLB degree from King’s College London, I work as a Policy Adviser to the CEO and Chairman of the Financial Ombudsman Service, an alternative dispute resolution organisation based in London’s Canary Wharf. In my spare time, I enjoy dancing from ballet to salsa, playing the piano and singing in a choir!

As the youngest member on the ZTFE Managing Committee, I have been running our monthly Extra Young Zoroastrian (XYZ) Fun Club religious education classes for children for the past six years, led in my role as Young Zoroastrian Chair for five years and continue to assist in the day to day running of the organisation.

My main passion in life is making a positive difference to our treasured Zoroastrian community by engaging and bringing together our youth. Growing up in the diaspora naturally brings its own challenges as first- and second-generation migrants. However, our community has grown from strength to strength in the UK over decades due to the hard work and commitment of all those who have dedicated their service. I am extremely proud to be a Young Zoroastrian in the UK today and being part of our vibrant community, with its indomitable spirit (and colourful characters!) fills me with a strong sense of belonging and joy. It is an absolute pleasure and a privilege to be involved in the 8WZYC in the hope that we can carry forward the Zoroastrian flame for future generations to come!

My first experience of a congress was at the 6th World Zoroastrian Youth Congress in New Zealand in 2015 where I was so proud to represent the UK Youth as a Speaker on the topic on how today’s youth inculcate a sense of pride about being Zoroastrian. Most recently in July 2019, I was invited to speak on the Women’s panel and Community Service panel at the 7th World Zoroastrian Youth Congress in Los Angeles. This also saw me being followed by the BBC for a World Service radio documentary which was a great experience!

Having now attended two youth congresses, I can truly say living, eating and being with 500 fellow Zarathushti youth was indeed a very surreal and special experience that I will treasure for my lifetime – almost like Hogwarts but for Young Zoroastrians! It’s definitely “A Kind of Magic” in Freddie’s words. As part of the experience, the host country also shared its culture and heritage with us from learning the Hakka in New Zealand to celebrating the 4th of July in Los Angeles.

For the 8WZYC in the UK, our vision is to build strong lasting global friendships, nurture worldwide communal initiatives and build on the future of our religion. As the Venue Lead for the 8WZYC, my role is to find the best environment and space to achieve our vision and create this strong legacy! Our key criteria for a venue include being close to the airport, accommodation and conference facilities for up to 500 delegates, dining and leisure facilities, and ensuring that the venue uses environmentally friendly and sustainable resources. We are keen to find a venue that is quintessentially English – we would love for our participants to experience the natural beauty, architecture and ancient history that our country has to offer!

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The search began with researching potential venues from hotels to university campuses (and even Buckingham Palace!), sending letters to explain who we are and what we are looking for, obtaining relevant quotes and then presenting my findings to my fellow committee members. Progress has been good so far and we are now at the stage of visiting prospective venues with a view to negotiating rates. As past Young Zoroastrian Chair, my fantastic team and I organised a wide range of fun activities, regular events and trips for our youth as well as for the wider community. I have drawn on my experience and skills in the search for our venue – from leadership and event organisation skills to negotiation and building strong relationships with key contacts.

Another consideration that is linked to our venue search is catering. Food is very important to all Zoroastrians as well all know! We will be working closely with the venue as well as external caterers to make sure our delegates experience traditional delicacies, and that everyone is well fed!

Searching for our congress venue has been a wonderful experience which I am thoroughly enjoying. Being part of the congress committee is a once in a lifetime opportunity and I am very excited to work together with our lovely team of volunteers to make the Congress an amazing experience for everyone! See you all in 2023 – London Baby!

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Technology creation ‘must reflect our diverse society if its to serve us all’: Lord Karan Bilimoria https://parsikhabar.net/science/technology-creation-must-reflect-our-diverse-society-if-its-to-serve-us-all-lord-karan-bilimoria/24111/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=technology-creation-must-reflect-our-diverse-society-if-its-to-serve-us-all-lord-karan-bilimoria https://parsikhabar.net/science/technology-creation-must-reflect-our-diverse-society-if-its-to-serve-us-all-lord-karan-bilimoria/24111/#disqus_thread Fri, 11 Sep 2020 23:03:52 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24111 CBI President Lord Karan Bilimoria will underscore the need for technology development to be truly representative of society if it is to deliver tangible benefits for ethnic communities, at the launch of the new CBI BAME in Tech Group. Lord Bilimoria will say with the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement in America, and […]]]>

CBI President Lord Karan Bilimoria will underscore the need for technology development to be truly representative of society if it is to deliver tangible benefits for ethnic communities, at the launch of the new CBI BAME in Tech Group.

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Lord Bilimoria will say with the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement in America, and around the world, has brought the potentially devastating consequences that bias can have into sharp focus. This bias extends to the way we innovate and develop technology.

The creation and deployment of technology shape society but, historically, BAME experiences have been neglected at both of these stages. Whether that is the lack of BAME representation in the tech sector, or the low uptake of STEM subjects in early education, or the inherent bias present in some AI systems, issues surrounding the relationship between BAME communities and technology are varied and complex. 

The new CBI group made of senior business leaders from across the tech industry including, telecoms, financial and professional services, will meet and seek to address the challenges facing BAME communities in the tech space. This will include showcasing initiatives to increase diversity in tech, tackling barriers in recruitment, promotion, and training, testing major policy initiatives and recommendations to ensure that the voice of ethnically diverse people are represented.

CBI President, Lord Karan Bilimoria, said:

“Since becoming CBI President one of my top priorities is to champion BAME representation across UK businesses and boardrooms. It is clear that increased ethnic minority representation in the tech sector is a critical issue that must be addressed.

“Ensuring that everyone has the same opportunities regardless of their background is not only the right thing to do. It also makes absolute business sense: whether it’s using computer algorithms to hire new staff or analysing employee performance, improving diversity in the tech sector will lead to better decision making and business outcomes.

“I am delighted to launch the CBI BAME in Tech group that will raise awareness of the key issues in this area. As the first BAME President of the CBI, the first Zoroastrian Parsi in the House of Lords, and as a young man of Indian background co-Founding Cobra beer in the 1980s London, I am passionate about sharing my experiences and supporting ethnic diversity through my role as CBI President.

“Looking forward, as we build back better from the economic impacts of coronavirus, technology will continue to profoundly shape the way we work, communicate and consume. We must have diversity in the technology sector if it is to serve the whole of society.”

Members will be invited to:

  • Showcase initiatives being conducted by their organisation to increase diversity in tech.

  • Share best practice and identify challenges around issues such as recruitment, promotion, and training.  

  • Act as a forum where major policy initiatives and recommendations can be tested, to ensure that the voice of ethnically diverse people is represented.

  • Develop outputs that address key issues of interest to the group, such as AI bias, participation in STEM subjects, or the role of tech in BAME business support. 

  • Build a network of diverse BAME executives across UK industry which brings together senior and ‘next generation’ BAME executives.

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Video Time Capsule for the Iranshah Initiative https://parsikhabar.net/udvada/video-time-capsule-for-the-iranshah-initiative/24106/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=video-time-capsule-for-the-iranshah-initiative https://parsikhabar.net/udvada/video-time-capsule-for-the-iranshah-initiative/24106/#disqus_thread Fri, 11 Sep 2020 15:55:35 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24106 Welcome to The Iranshah Initiative Part 2 of 3: In the words of French Novelist Anatole France…To accomplish great things we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe. In today’s day and age, we face several challenges. One in particular is the sanctity of our history and religion. As […]]]>

Welcome to The Iranshah Initiative Part 2 of 3:

In the words of French Novelist Anatole France…To accomplish great things we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe.

In today’s day and age, we face several challenges. One in particular is the sanctity of our history and religion. As a result, planning is imperative.

Simply put, what would you want your children to know about Iranshah?

Tell us about your fondest experience, what it means to visit, how you learnt about the history or how you envisage the next generation keeping the fire burning forevermore.

Help us help them shape their future by sharing your thoughts, emotions and feelings about Iranshah. We want to hear from you no matter how long or short the message is.

Join the Iranshah Initiative by contributing to the Time Capsule and be a part of our planning for history.

Submit a video to The Iranshah Time Capsule

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Marzy Parakh In Conversation with HrishiKay | Live To Give https://parsikhabar.net/news/marzy-parakh-in-conversation-with-hrishikay-live-to-give/24102/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=marzy-parakh-in-conversation-with-hrishikay-live-to-give Tue, 08 Sep 2020 18:48:39 +0000 https://parsikhabar.net/?p=24102 Marzy Parakh with Hrishikay speaking about the burning desire to give back to society, identifying needy individuals & helping them by contributing time or money plus case studies from his not for profit ‘Live To Give India’ Marzy Parakh from Live To Give India with me. For one so young he understands the importance of […]]]>

Marzy Parakh with Hrishikay speaking about the burning desire to give back to society, identifying needy individuals & helping them by contributing time or money plus case studies from his not for profit ‘Live To Give India’

Marzy Parakh from Live To Give India with me. For one so young he understands the importance of giving itself being the road to salvation and true happiness. #MarzyParakh talks about his incredible #LiveToGiveIndia which has transformed so many lives. He simplifies it down to identifying needy individuals & then helping them by contributing time or money. But the structure itself is so well mapped out & organised – it has to be for the volume of work they have taken on. You must listen to this interview to understand that if motives are pure the universe still listens and listens beautifully. And do whatsapp 98200 84060 to if you or someone you know is in need or if you or someone you know wants to contribute ( time or money ). Keep on the great work dear #marzy and team.

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