Freddie Mercury to be honoured with London memorial

Late rock legend Freddie Mercury is set to be honoured in his hometown with his own Hollywood Walk of Fame-style star.

The British musician, best known as the frontman of the rock band Queen, fled Zanzibar, Tanzania as a child with his family at a time of political unrest in the African region, and they set up home in Feltham, West London.

Mercury died of bronchopneumonia induced by HIV (AIDS) on November 24, 1991, only a day after publicly acknowledging he had the disease.

Now, local authorities have decided to remember the superstar by laying a memorial plaque in the town on November 24 (09).

Councillor Paul Jabbal hopes the tribute will make local residents realise that anyone can achieve their goals.

‘I am delighted that at last we are honouring Freddie Mercury’s memory and his achievements with a permanent memorial,’ the Daily Express quoted him as saying.

‘As well as celebrating his life and success, it can serve as a reminder to local people that it doesn’t matter where you come from, if you work hard you can succeed in whatever you do,’ he added.

Mercury, who was a Parsi and grew up in India [ Images ], has been referred to as ‘Britain’s first Asian rock star’.

Original article here.

  • judy kay wilson-synar

    I am delighted that Parsi Khabar has published something about Mr. Bulsara. I have sent numerous pieces about Freddie’s genius mind/accomplishments to this website, hoping one would be published; none have been. Freddie is the most famous member of your community and yet his enormous contributions to the world are rarely recognized by his own. It saddens me that whenever you do say something about FM, you always push to the front the cause of death. We all know how/why Freddie died; now, consider examining why he lived. One hundred years from now there will be more university courses taught about the Maestro’s Music than there are now about Mozart’s. It is true, the percentage of geniuses in the Zoroastrian population is much higher compared to the percentage of geniuses within the general human population. The pride you carry for this fact is valid but you diminish its relevance when Mr. Mercury is often kicked to the curb by your members. Mr. Mercury’s eidetic memory is a direct result of the Zoroastrian genetic recipe. Mozart was possessed by this same rare type of memory, and, spent his lifetime composing music, layered & complex, just as Freddie did. Freddie’s Legacy is very important to those of us who recognize and appreciate his genius. In the future, I hope to see more written about Mr. Bulsara’s accomplishments in the Parsi Khabar.

  • Judy we have in the past published a lot of articles about Freddie Mercury. You can search through our archives.

    We do not remember receiving any article links or tips from you. Please make sure you send them to us via the “Suggest an article” link on the top of this page (and every page). That is the best and the most assured way of us receiving a link.

  • Deborah Riccio

    Having read the above article I am in agreement with Judy; in that Freddie Mercury was one of the great musical masters of our time. I to would like to read more articles focused on his accomplishments rather than his death. For me listening to his amazing voice and pondering his his musical abilities astounds me….I have only to say …Freddie Mercury is a musician and composer that wrote his music using a paint brush rather than a pen; each well crafted note put together to create a portrait of one of this centuries brilliant composers.

  • judy kay wilson-synar

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P61pnsiZuvw

    So all you people give freely
    Make welcome inside your homes, wow
    Thank God you people give freely
    Don’t turn your back on the lesson of the lord

    All prime ministers, yeah, and majesties around the world, yeah
    Open your eyes, look touch and feel, yeah
    Rule with your heart (rule with your heart)
    (Live with your) live with your conscience
    And love, love and be
    Love, love and be free
    We’re all God’s people

    Gotta face up, better grow up
    Gotta stand tall and be strong
    Gotta face up, better grow up

    Gotta face up, better grow up
    Gotta stand tall and be strong
    Gotta face up, better grow up

    We’re all God’s people (gotta face up, better grow up)
    (Gotta face up), yeah, (better grow up), yeah

    Yes, yeah
    Yes, there was this magic light
    I said to myself
    I’d better go to bed and have an early night
    Then I, then I, then I, then I went into a dream

    Rule with your heart and live with your conscience

    We’re all God’s people
    Give freely, yeah
    Make welcome inside your homes
    Let us be thankful he’s so incredible

    We’re all God’s people
    We’re all God’s, we’re all God’s
    We’re all God’s, we’re all God’s, ooooh

    We’re all God’s people
    We’re all God’s
    We’re all God’s

    Knowing his time was running out, Mr. Mercury rushed to get as much of the Music out of his head and onto recordings as was possible; so much composition/lyric that all of it could not be released before the end. All God’s People, however, was contained in the Album “Innuendo” which was released in 1991. All God’s People is a gospel song, Music/Lyric all by Mercury. Actually, I feel and believe this composition should be more appropriately categorized as an anthem released from his Zoroastrian core. It may not be the most complex nor the most multi layered but it screams heartfelt feelings and beliefs he carried from the day of his birth until the end. I often wonder if the Parsi community even knows of its existence. Mr. Mercury often included Zoroastrian core beliefs in his lyrics. During the early years, they were written in a Zoroastrian-riddle style; but in the last days he wrote about God up front and out on the table, for all the world to know his Soul, exposing his deepest longings for these simple yet grand Principles of faith and community from which he came. At the top of this reply, I have posted a YouTube link which will take your readers directly to All God’s People for their listening. I would very much enjoy reading some of their sentiments in this comment space. In conclusion, we must remember that genetically Mr. Bulsara was Pure Persian, was born pure and died genetically pure; nothing he could have done could ever change the circumstance of his genes. On the other hand, during that lifetime, there was a “work in progress” related to his Faith; it was a changing, ongoing, powerful creation inside of his Soul which seemed to climb higher and higher with each passing day. I think of my own three children, all middle aged, now, who were born into a particular religion, baptized, confirmed, and labeled; yet each of them continues to change and grow into that religious birth rite which some day each will hopefully fulfill. I try to be very attentive/sensitive to that growth process because I appreciate the potential rewards they will experience when full realization is achieved. For some of us, those rewards/enlightments come sooner rather than later; for others it may require a whole lifetime. We are all God’s people and we are all unique individuals trying our best to know our Creator while swimming through the fiery circumstances of this precious mysterious thing we call Life.

  • judy kay wilson-synar

    Ms. Riccio: What a lovely phrase “..wrote his music using a paint brush rather than a pen..”

    I hope someday those exact words can be carved in a granite monument located in downtown Bombay (Mumbai). And, your beautiful words capture the Reality of Mr. Bulsara, the true Artist. He let his fountain flow as long as it was humanly possible. So much gratitude we share feeling him struggle to the very end. Thank you for your comment.

  • Barbara Johnson

    The measure of a man should be in how he lived, not how he died. Freddie Mercury was an incredibly talented man who gave generously of himself to the world, making the it a better place with his ground breaking melodies and lyrics, incomparable voice, and electrifying performances, bringing happiness to and enriching the lives of millions. It is for this that he should be remembered, not for the manner of his death.

  • aziza c.mendoza

    Freddie’s is a gift of music which he gives to us: each note and each progression seems to bypass the ears, bypass the brain and sit squarely on the soul. The shivers that pass through the spine even with his video presence in the latest tour eclipse all that has gone before in the concert and all that will come after: that is his presence, and that is his gift…
    Religious people knew and understood,that whatever deeds we had we are the solely accountable for it..The Mercy belong to the CREATOR alone.Judging anyone sins are not our concern, Maybe to us he was a sinner but never in the eye of the Beholder.Its the FATE..written to everyone of us…

  • judy kay wilson-synar

    Ms. Johnson: This article has been published/read for several days, now. Three people have posted thoughtful comments; two of the three, Johnson and Riccio, seem to carry surnames which are most likely not recognizable as Zoroastrian. Dont you suspect that Parsi Khabar’s general reader population is Parsi? And, if that be so, where are their “good words?” The quietness of this remarkable community which has given the world so much………….speaks so loud that it makes my ears hurt. Tomorrow Jer Bulsara’s mind will be filled all day with sad remembrances that only a mother’s love can feel. Surely, there is at least one Parsi who can relate to that bitter hour, write a thoughtful comment, and let the rest of the world know that….”good thoughts…good words….good deeds”…..is still believed and acted upon.

  • Linda Galasso

    I am dismayed to hear of man’s sin when there is so known little known about our sexuality. Is it also a sin to be born with a cleft lip, down syndrome or too many teeth? Why do we use the word “sin” for things we do not understand?

    Thank you Judy, Debbie and Barbara for stating the facts as they are and for what truly matters in life.

    Freddie was, indeed, an artist of immeasurable talent. His every creation was nothing less than perfection. How lucky are we to witness, in our lifetime, the richness, depth and superiority of all his gifts, which he bestowed upon us with an immense passion and pleasure.

    Freddie has inspired us, taught us, lifted our spirits, and made us smile. His keen sense of humor, impeccable timing and boundless energy made him the consummate professional that he was. His craft was a labor of love and his zest for life was evident with every performance. He labored tirelessly in his endeavor to deliver his messages, and asked for nothing in return but love.

    Freddie was truly a gift to us all, from above. He has touched my life as well as hundreds of thousands of others, and made our world a much better place. We celebrate his life and remember him always.

    The Bulsara’s must feel tremendous love and pride in the legend that is their son, Freddie Mercury.

  • All I have to say is us Parsi’s should be very proud of what Freddie achieved in his life time which non of us could. How he died does not even cross my mind, its how he lived with his passion for music and became world famous. Well done Bulsara’s you have made our Nation Proud,From All Zoroastrians in South Africa.

  • judy kay wilson-synar

    Dear Firdosh: My heart sings reading your reply. Finally, a Parsi steps up with a comment. And, not just any comment, but one that defends Farrokh Bulsara’s Life and beautiful Zoroastrian family. Thank you so very much. One out of 80,000 has done what none other would do. If you ever come to Oklahoma, plz inform me; I want to cook dinner for you, southern style; I invite you to walk with me Min my woods where nature’s beauty will astound you; I want my family to meet you so they will know a Parsi with good thoughts, good words, and good deeds. Yesterday, in Feltham U.K., where the granite monument commemorating Freddie’s Life & Art was dedicated, a tiny, kind, soft spoken and radiant 88 year old woman spoke: “Mrs Bulsara told the crowds: Im Jer Bulsara, and Freddie was my boy. He grew up to be a man with a big appetite for life and? an even bigger talent for music.” Firdosh, I am including your comment in the same paragraph as Jer’s. I hope she will read what you wrote and feel the love from ONE of her own. My email address is: jkws@ecewb.com; plz write to me and let me know you.

  • Linda Galasso

    Thank you Firdosh, from Freddie fans everywhere!

  • judy kay wilson-synar

    To All Zoroastrians in South Africa: Your countryman, Firdosh, has spoken eloquently on your behalf. On tomorrow, my family celebrates Thanksgiving in the wilderness of Oklahoma where our American roots lie. I have cooked all week and will be serving twenty eight (28) at a beautiful sit-down dinner. It is our tradition, before eating, to join hands and thank God (Ahura Mazda) for our blessings, our friends, and our good fortunes. Be informed, Zoroastrian citizens of South Africa/Firdosh, our prayer tomorrow will call out YOUR country and the collective Zoroastrian community, there. Firdosh, we will salute YOU in our circle and hope that you can join us someday. Our name, Synar, is the Greek (Septuagent) translation for Shinar; our genetic material comes from the Plain of Shinar which lies between the Tigres & Euphrates Rivers; we carry 3,500 year old genes, as you do, and we try our best to always speak good words, have good thoughts, and do good deeds. Now, can you imagine that? Right here in the backwoods of Oklahoma, our hopes, like yours, are the same.
    Fond Regards,
    J.K. Wilson-Synar
    AD, R.N., BS, MA

  • Deborah Riccio

    You Firdosh are the best.. That was a great and heartfelt comment about a man I admire along with millions of others. I have been for a long time very interested in your culture and traditions..They were inbedded into the very fabric of Freddie’s being..many of the songs he composed were filled with messages of his faith and culture. One only has to look and listen. I acknowledge Freddie’s roots as being at the core of his genius mind; the very essence of his creativity.
    Thank You for your response and appreciation of his life and legacy.

  • judy kay wilson-synar

    Ms. Galasso: I’ve been studying your words: “His every creation was nothing less than perfection. ” That sentence is one which should be pondered; and, If one removes the word “every” from the sentence, the statement becomes exact essence of Zoroastrian Principle of intra marriage. There are those in the Z community, and outside the community, who from time to time waver on the pros & cons of holding to this Principle. Some, choose to marry outside for personal or medical reasons; and, some KEEP the Principle. Mr. Mercury is a genetic example of that KEPT rule. Linda, you speak of perfection….Mr. Mercury’s Gifts ARE jewels of that perfection…his Mind was a living example of Perfection. His perfect melodies and lyrics contain musical joy AND they contain recipes for right living. There is so much we do not understand about mind/brain interaction; how its genetic purity can unleash (truth) within the context of current cognition; and, how its purity can unleash (T)ruths from a past that is more than 3,500 years old. Collective Memory (genetic memory) can be witnessed in its purist form, today, in Zoroastrians who have kept this principle. I, for one, watch and listen to what the Zoroastrian community does and says because I am a living witness to potentially Pure thoughts, words, and deeds. In, All God’s People (lyric posted above), there is a call to the people: “All prime ministers, yeah, and majesties around the world, yeah
    Open your eyes, look touch and feel, yeah
    Rule with your heart (rule with your heart)
    (Live with your) live with your conscience”…..in this lyrice Mr. Bulsara uses his “stage” to speak to those on our planet who possess political power, those who need to hear Truth brought out of a 3,500 year old volcano. Usually, we dont think of words in songs as having any kind of crucial meaning; but so many words and phrases in Mercury’s lyrics do SHINE A HOLY LIGHT on matters which can be of great importance to all people of the Earth. If I could sit down and visit with Mr. Wadia or Mr. Firdosh, I would cling to there every word, for that illusive (T)ruth may come from their minds and mouths, as well. It was Mercury’s STAGE which allowed so many of us, for the first time in our lives, to hear these “perfect jewels” and, for some of us who have studied genetics and collective memory, to ponder the meanings, unravel the Zoroastrian Riddles, and quite literally look into the Mind of God, if only for a brief moment in time. Thank you Ms. Galasso for your thoughtful comment.