Vulture breeding plan shelved

The world’s first vulture breeding programme for a socio-religious purpose has been shelved. Parsis are traditionally laid to rest in Mumbai’s Tower of Silence where vultures (now endangered) devour their dead bodies. But scientists from the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) say that the breeding programme, which would have cost Rs 1 crore, would have failed because of the use of diclofenac-laced painkillers by Parsis. Diclofenac has proven deadly for vultures.

“We had been considering the project for long in order to breed enough birds for the Parsi tradition. But scientists studying the proposal shelved it saying it will not be possible since the vultures eating the dead bodies with diclofenac in them will die anyway,” says Minal Shroff, chairman of the Bombay Parsi Panchayat, which was spearheading the programme.

Jehangir Bismey of the Hyderabad-Secunderabad Parsi Panchayat says the proposal for the breeding programme was flawed from the beginning. “You can not breed vultures in captivity. It is scientifically impossible since they breed only in open and lay eggs in a pattern that cannot be achieved in captivity. The project was being considered only because of the pulls and pressures of certain lobbies in the community,” he says.

Original article here

  • rustom jamasji

    About captive vulture breeding programes.copied from the net, various sites.
    Ofcourse its a time consuming solution but also permanent soulution. Also one has to realise that the captive breeding programes have themselves evolved and thus the scienist have learnt and improved the strategies and equipment which lessens th time now.
    Also the Parsi’s dont have to start from scratch but can leap to the present day vulture consevation programes with the knowledge of the scienist and conservationist and also take help from charities invlolving vulture conservation.
    But ofcourse , wher do we get the will and how do we tackle the sttitude of anti aviary lobby within the community, are the questions to be asked!!!!Also we have leaders that pronounce fiction as facts such as Jehangirs bisney statement that capive breeding is not possible.
    …………………………………………………..

    Chick success for Asian vultures

    Conservationists hope the vulture chick will be the first of many Conservationists are celebrating the arrival of the first oriental white-backed vulture chick to be born in captivity in India.
    The bird belongs to one of three species of Asian vulture that are listed as critically endangered.

    Populations in the wild have crashed because they eat carcasses containing traces of the drug diclofenac.

    The use of the anti-inflammatory drug in the region is being phased out but it could take 10 years, scientists say.

    Dr Vibhu Prakash, principal scientist for the vulture breeding programme, said: “This is the most precious new year gift from nature to vulture conservation.”

    The egg was laid in November and the centre’s staff had been waiting and hoping ever since, he added.

    “This success shows that we have got the conditions right, so we can plan ahead with confidence.”

    Soaring death toll

    We have to measure all of our successes against the backdrop that we are still talking about the extinction of the vultures

    Nick Lindsay,
    Zoological Society of London
    The breeding centre, based in Pinjore, northern India, is run by the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS), and is supported by Indian government departments and organisations, including the UK’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

    Nick Lindsay, ZSL’s head of international zoo programmes, said the society had been heavily involved in the centre since the late 1990s.

    “It was established with a UK government Darwin Initiative grant, when the cause of the decline in vultures was still being investigated,” he said.

    The centre shifted its focus from research to breeding once it was discovered that diclofenac, a drug widely used by vets in the region to treat cattle, was the main reason for the vultures’ deaths.

    The link was firmly established in 2004 when tests on captive vultures fed carcass flesh traced with the drug produced symptoms that were strikingly similar to those witnessed in sick birds in the wild.

    Mr Lindsay said the centre’s work concentrated on the three species most seriously affected by diclofenac: the oriental white-backed vulture (Gyps bengalensis), the long-billed vulture (Gyps indicus) and the slender-billed vulture (Gyps tenuirostris).

    In the past 15 years, population losses of more than 95% have been reported in these birds.

    ‘Worrying scenario’

    Although India, Pakistan and Nepal were taking steps to phase out the use of the drug, Mr Lindsay said the birds’ battle for survival was far from over.

    Vultures used to be a more common sight in the skies
    “We have to measure all of our successes against the backdrop that we are still talking about the extinction of the vultures,” he warned.

    “The communities that use this drug can be remote; cattle are literally found in their millions and people care very much for their well-being, so the drug is still being widely used because it is a very effective treatment for the cattle.

    “If you take all those different factors, it creates quite a worrying scenario.”

    But he added that there were some projects on the ground that were helping to take the drug out of circulation.

    In Nepal, conservation groups were visiting pharmacies and clinics located within areas used by vultures and swapping supplies of diclofenac with a bird-friendly replacement, meloxicam.

    “This sort of thing might be possible in Nepal because it is a much smaller country than India and the problem is not as extensive,” he suggested.

    “But even then it is going to be a struggle because the range of these birds is so vast.”

    ……………………………………………………

    Can Captive Breeding Rescue Vultures from Extinction?

    “In concept it is very simple. In practice it takes a lot of time,” Watson said. “We are talking a minimum of 20 years, more like 30 years, of effort. And it’s not cheap.”

    Estimated costs for the project run as high as one million U.S. dollars each year. Watson said that while such funding is not yet secured, conservationists have gotten the governments of India, Pakistan, and Nepal to commit to species restoration.

    The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds is working in India with the Bombay Natural History Society and the Haryana state government to expand a vulture care center in the town of Pinjore. The center is designed to look after sick and injured birds and to include a captive-breeding program. Additional support for the expansion effort comes from the United Kingdom-based Institute of Zoology and the U.K. National Bird of Prey Trust.

    Pain said three aviaries large enough to hold 20 birds of each of the three species are currently being built at the facility. Plans call for further expansions.

    The United Arab Emirates’ Environmental Research and Wildlife Development Agency has offered to host 25 breeding pairs of each species for Pakistan and Nepal for a few years, until those countries develop local facilities and expertise for captive breeding.
    Recovery Possible?
    According to Watson, the chances of a successful recovery for the Asian white-backed vulture and the long-billed vulture are good, assuming that captive breeding populations can be quickly established. He is more concerned about the slender-billed vulture.

    “There are so few individuals left of this species that to my knowledge, no one knows if they are even breeding at this point. So chances of collecting enough birds for a successful captive-breeding effort are much reduced,” he said.

    According to Pain, if the international bird-conservation community works together and successfully implements a captive-breeding program, the vultures can be saved. “I don’t think it will be easy, but it’s certainly possible,” she said.

    Meanwhile, the impact of the vulture decline is already being felt throughout the subcontinent. Rotting carcasses left uneaten by vultures pose a health hazard. Such carcasses are linked to the spread of diseases such as anthrax, according to the conservationists.

    Other animals, such as rats, cats, and dogs, are filling the niche once filled by vultures. Wild dog populations in particular have increased substantially, leading to an increase in the spread of rabies and physical attacks on people.

    Given the proven ability to bring vultures back from brink of extinction, Watson said action must be taken: “In this day and age of rapid species extinction, it is exceedingly foolish to let a species go extinct when there’s something you can do about it.”
    ………………………………………………….
    Compare the attitude of Zoroastrians that flew the aden flame to India in a plane, taking permission from indian govt.and shifting it to Puna.
    Compare the zoroastrians who migrated to india who rekindled the consecrated fires to keep alive the zoroastrian faith.Without them here would have been no fire temples and dokhma’s and thus zoroastrianism would have not survived as zoroastrian practises would have not started again in a foreign land.
    NOW WE HAVE THE LEADERS WHO WANT TO CLOE DOKHMENISHINI SYSTEM , OPEN UP THE AGIARIES AND SELL PRECIOUS LANDS LIKE THE Parsi lying in hospital.

  • rustom jamasji

    .

  • rustom jamasji

    California Condor lays egg in Mexico
    Staff and agencies
    05 April, 2007

    By THOMAS WATKINS, Associated Press Writer Mon Apr 2, 7:09 PM ET

    SAN DIEGO – A California condor has laid an egg in Mexico for the first time since at least the 1930s, biologists at the Zoological Society of San Diego announced Monday. If the chick hatches and survives, scientists hope it will herald the return of a breeding condor population to Mexico, decades after the iconic giant of the skies was wiped out there.

    Wallace and colleagues found the egg March 25 in an abandoned eagle nest on a cliff in the Sierra San Pedro de Martir National Park, located in the arid interior of the Baja California peninsula more than 100 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border.

    “We are all sitting on pins and needles waiting to see where the situation is going,” said Wallace, who works for the zoological society‘s center for Conservation and Research for Endangered Species. The society also runs the San Diego Zoo and its wild animal park.

    A type of vulture, the condor scavenges dead fish and animals — as coastal population of seals and otters declined, so too did the bird. The use of poison to kill California‘s grizzly bears in the 1800s also devastated numbers and lead shot remains a potential source of poison. Hunting, egg collecting, and power cables were also blamed for hurting the creature‘s numbers.

    Thanks to a captive-breeding program, numbers recovered to a worldwide total of about 280. More than 100 of these fly free in the skies above parts of California, Nevada and Utah. Working with the Mexican government, biologists reintroduced captive-bred birds to Mexico in 2002.

    Weighing up to 26 pounds and with a wingspan of almost 10 feet, the California condor is one of the world‘s largest birds. Another species of condor, found in the Andes, is also under threat but its numbers are in the thousands, Wallace said.

    ___

    Conservation and Research for Endangered Species, http://cres.sandiegozoo.org/

    By THOMAS WATKINS, Associated Press Writer Mon Apr 2, 7:09 PM ET

    SAN DIEGO – A California condor has laid an egg in Mexico for the first time since at least the 1930s, biologists at the Zoological Society of San Diego announced Monday. If the chick hatches and survives, scientists hope it will herald the return of a breeding condor population to Mexico, decades after the iconic giant of the skies was wiped out there.

    Wallace and colleagues found the egg March 25 in an abandoned eagle nest on a cliff in the Sierra San Pedro de Martir National Park, located in the arid interior of the Baja California peninsula more than 100 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border.

    “We are all sitting on pins and needles waiting to see where the situation is going,” said Wallace, who works for the zoological society‘s center for Conservation and Research for Endangered Species. The society also runs the San Diego Zoo and its wild animal park.

    A type of vulture, the condor scavenges dead fish and animals — as coastal population of seals and otters declined, so too did the bird. The use of poison to kill California‘s grizzly bears in the 1800s also devastated numbers and lead shot remains a potential source of poison. Hunting, egg collecting, and power cables were also blamed for hurting the creature‘s numbers.

    Thanks to a captive-breeding program, numbers recovered to a worldwide total of about 280. More than 100 of these fly free in the skies above parts of California, Nevada and Utah. Working with the Mexican government, biologists reintroduced captive-bred birds to Mexico in 2002.

    Weighing up to 26 pounds and with a wingspan of almost 10 feet, the California condor is one of the world‘s largest birds. Another species of condor, found in the Andes, is also under threat but its numbers are in the thousands, Wallace said.

    ___

    Conservation and Research for Endangered Species, http://cres.sandiegozoo.org/

  • rustom jamasji

    Well how come then scientists and conservationist are saying that captive breeding is the main solution to increase vulture population. Jehangir Bismey would you like to challenge reports of sucessfull vulture conservation programes.Ofcourse this takes time but then all permanent solutions do. Lack of will from you guys who potray yourselves as leaders, no solution for that and ofcourse millions of excuses within the parsi punchayats that aid land grabebrs and those who want to start a crematorium or buriyal system.
    Compare this with the zoroastrians that migrated to india. iF THEY WOULD HAVE NOT haD THE WILL , THER WOULD HAVE BEEN NO fire temple nor a dokhma nor zoroastrianism as zorastrian culture would cease to exist witht he decline or non rekindling of zorastrian practises.
    Compare the story of the Aden fire being shifted in a PLANE from Aden to India and then to poona!It happened because of the will..
    Here are some cut and copied articles from the net of the importance of captive vulture programes.
    We have an advantage as we can skip the learning curve of an aviary as conservationist and scientist have already bettered if not mastered captive breeding. Also since the 1990’s new equipment and strategies have evolved. The world body for vulture conservation is also helping. then why we as a community cannot take the oppurtunity.Is it because our leaders falter?

    California Condor lays egg in Mexico
    Staff and agencies
    05 April, 2007

    By THOMAS WATKINS, Associated Press Writer Mon Apr 2, 7:09 PM ET

    SAN DIEGO – A California condor has laid an egg in Mexico for the first time since at least the 1930s, biologists at the Zoological Society of San Diego announced Monday. If the chick hatches and survives, scientists hope it will herald the return of a breeding condor population to Mexico, decades after the iconic giant of the skies was wiped out there.

    Wallace and colleagues found the egg March 25 in an abandoned eagle nest on a cliff in the Sierra San Pedro de Martir National Park, located in the arid interior of the Baja California peninsula more than 100 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border.

    “We are all sitting on pins and needles waiting to see where the situation is going,” said Wallace, who works for the zoological society‘s center for Conservation and Research for Endangered Species. The society also runs the San Diego Zoo and its wild animal park.

    A type of vulture, the condor scavenges dead fish and animals — as coastal population of seals and otters declined, so too did the bird. The use of poison to kill California‘s grizzly bears in the 1800s also devastated numbers and lead shot remains a potential source of poison. Hunting, egg collecting, and power cables were also blamed for hurting the creature‘s numbers.

    Thanks to a captive-breeding program, numbers recovered to a worldwide total of about 280. More than 100 of these fly free in the skies above parts of California, Nevada and Utah. Working with the Mexican government, biologists reintroduced captive-bred birds to Mexico in 2002.

    Weighing up to 26 pounds and with a wingspan of almost 10 feet, the California condor is one of the world‘s largest birds. Another species of condor, found in the Andes, is also under threat but its numbers are in the thousands, Wallace said.

    ___

    Conservation and Research for Endangered Species, http://cres.sandiegozoo.org/

    By THOMAS WATKINS, Associated Press Writer Mon Apr 2, 7:09 PM ET

    SAN DIEGO – A California condor has laid an egg in Mexico for the first time since at least the 1930s, biologists at the Zoological Society of San Diego announced Monday. If the chick hatches and survives, scientists hope it will herald the return of a breeding condor population to Mexico, decades after the iconic giant of the skies was wiped out there.

    Wallace and colleagues found the egg March 25 in an abandoned eagle nest on a cliff in the Sierra San Pedro de Martir National Park, located in the arid interior of the Baja California peninsula more than 100 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border.

    “We are all sitting on pins and needles waiting to see where the situation is going,” said Wallace, who works for the zoological society‘s center for Conservation and Research for Endangered Species. The society also runs the San Diego Zoo and its wild animal park.

    A type of vulture, the condor scavenges dead fish and animals — as coastal population of seals and otters declined, so too did the bird. The use of poison to kill California‘s grizzly bears in the 1800s also devastated numbers and lead shot remains a potential source of poison. Hunting, egg collecting, and power cables were also blamed for hurting the creature‘s numbers.

    Thanks to a captive-breeding program, numbers recovered to a worldwide total of about 280. More than 100 of these fly free in the skies above parts of California, Nevada and Utah. Working with the Mexican government, biologists reintroduced captive-bred birds to Mexico in 2002.

    Weighing up to 26 pounds and with a wingspan of almost 10 feet, the California condor is one of the world‘s largest birds. Another species of condor, found in the Andes, is also under threat but its numbers are in the thousands, Wallace said.

    Conservation and Research for Endangered Species, http://cres.sandiegozoo.org/
    ……………………………………………………
    Vultures breed in captivity to beat annihilation
    2 Apr, 2007 l 2030 hrs ISTlNeha Shukla/TIMES NEWS NETWORK

    LUCKNOW: A commonly sighted bird till a decade ago, vulture is nowhere to be seen now. However, the first chick to have born in a captive breeding centre in India has sent the hopes soaring for the near extinct species of the bird.

    The Oriental white-backed vulture chick that hatched at the breeding centre in Pinjore, Haryana, belongs to one of the three Asian vulture species facing the threat of extinction. Asian vultures have declined tremendously over the years, “by some 99 per cent”, say scientists.

    “This is the most precious new year gift from the Nature to vulture conservation. The egg was laid in November and since then, we have been waiting and hoping. This success shows that we have got the conditions right, so now we can plan ahead towards breeding many more,” shares Vibhu Prakash, principal scientist for vulture breeding programme, Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS).

    Indian sub-continent is home to nine species of vultures. Out of which the white-backed vulture (Gyps Bengalensis), long-billed vulture (Gyps Indicus) and slender-billed vulture (Gyps Tenuirostris) are the rarest. The IUCN World Conservation Union has classified all the three Asian vulture species as critically endangered.

    The first sign of the rapid vulture decline appeared at the Kaladeo National Park in Rajasthan. And by start of 2000, there were almost no breeding pairs left, says BNHS official adding, “It was then that extensive survey was done and found that in many places the birds were completely missing.”

    Leaving aside natural reasons, what came out behind the rapid decline of the bird is a drug called `diclofenac’ which is given by vets to cattle to treat Mastitis, limps and other disorders. And vultures preying on carcasses get infected with it. As a result, the bird suffers from kidney failure, visceral gout and dehydration and dies within few days.

    “Vultures are declining by 22 to 48 per cent each year in India. And the reason is their feeding on carcasses of livestock treated with the drug Diclofenac shortly before death,” says Chris Bowden, head of the Vulture Conservation Programme, Royal Society for Protection of Birds.

    …………………………………………………..
    Can Captive Breeding Rescue Vultures from Extinction?
    “In concept it is very simple. In practice it takes a lot of time,” Watson said. “We are talking a minimum of 20 years, more like 30 years, of effort. And it’s not cheap.”
    Estimated costs for the project run as high as one million U.S. dollars each year. Watson said that while such funding is not yet secured, conservationists have gotten the governments of India, Pakistan, and Nepal to commit to species restoration.

    The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds is working in India with the Bombay Natural History Society and the Haryana state government to expand a vulture care center in the town of Pinjore. The center is designed to look after sick and injured birds and to include a captive-breeding program.

    Additional support for the expansion effort comes from the United Kingdom-based Institute of Zoology and the U.K. National Bird of Prey Trust.

    Pain said three aviaries large enough to hold 20 birds of each of the three species are currently being built at the facility. Plans call for further expansions.

    The United Arab Emirates’ Environmental Research and Wildlife Development Agency has offered to host 25 breeding pairs of each species for Pakistan and Nepal for a few years, until those countries develop local facilities and expertise for captive breeding.

    Recovery Possible?

    According to Watson, the chances of a successful recovery for the Asian white-backed vulture and the long-billed vulture are good, assuming that captive breeding populations can be quickly established. He is more concerned about the slender-billed vulture.

    “There are so few individuals left of this species that to my knowledge, no one knows if they are even breeding at this point. So chances of collecting enough birds for a successful captive-breeding effort are much reduced,” he said.

    According to Pain, if the international bird-conservation community works together and successfully implements a captive-breeding program, the vultures can be saved. “I don’t think it will be easy, but it’s certainly possible,” she said.

    Meanwhile, the impact of the vulture decline is already being felt throughout the subcontinent. Rotting carcasses left uneaten by vultures pose a health hazard. Such carcasses are linked to the spread of diseases such as anthrax, according to the conservationists.

    Other animals, such as rats, cats, and dogs, are filling the niche once filled by vultures. Wild dog populations in particular have increased substantially, leading to an increase in the spread of rabies and physical attacks on people.

    Given the proven ability to bring vultures back from brink of extinction, Watson said action must be taken: “In this day and age of rapid species extinction, it is exceedingly foolish to let a species go extinct when there’s something you can do about it.”
    …………………………………………………..

    Last Updated: Monday, 8 January 2007, 18:17 GMT

    E-mail this to a friend Printable version

    Chick success for Asian vultures

    Conservationists hope the vulture chick will be the first of many
    Conservationists are celebrating the arrival of the first oriental white-backed vulture chick to be born in captivity in India.
    The bird belongs to one of three species of Asian vulture that are listed as critically endangered.

    Populations in the wild have crashed because they eat carcasses containing traces of the drug diclofenac.

    The use of the anti-inflammatory drug in the region is being phased out but it could take 10 years, scientists say.

    Dr Vibhu Prakash, principal scientist for the vulture breeding programme, said: “This is the most precious new year gift from nature to vulture conservation.”

    The egg was laid in November and the centre’s staff had been waiting and hoping ever since, he added.

    “This success shows that we have got the conditions right, so we can plan ahead with confidence.”

    Soaring death toll

    We have to measure all of our successes against the backdrop that we are still talking about the extinction of the vultures

    Nick Lindsay,
    Zoological Society of London
    The breeding centre, based in Pinjore, northern India, is run by the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS), and is supported by Indian government departments and organisations, including the UK’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

    Nick Lindsay, ZSL’s head of international zoo programmes, said the society had been heavily involved in the centre since the late 1990s.

    “It was established with a UK government Darwin Initiative grant, when the cause of the decline in vultures was still being investigated,” he said.

    The centre shifted its focus from research to breeding once it was discovered that diclofenac, a drug widely used by vets in the region to treat cattle, was the main reason for the vultures’ deaths.

    The link was firmly established in 2004 when tests on captive vultures fed carcass flesh traced with the drug produced symptoms that were strikingly similar to those witnessed in sick birds in the wild.

    Mr Lindsay said the centre’s work concentrated on the three species most seriously affected by diclofenac: the oriental white-backed vulture (Gyps bengalensis), the long-billed vulture (Gyps indicus) and the slender-billed vulture (Gyps tenuirostris).

    In the past 15 years, population losses of more than 95% have been reported in these birds.

    ‘Worrying scenario’

    Although India, Pakistan and Nepal were taking steps to phase out the use of the drug, Mr Lindsay said the birds’ battle for survival was far from over.

    Vultures used to be a more common sight in the skies
    “We have to measure all of our successes against the backdrop that we are still talking about the extinction of the vultures,” he warned.

    “The communities that use this drug can be remote; cattle are literally found in their millions and people care very much for their well-being, so the drug is still being widely used because it is a very effective treatment for the cattle.

    “If you take all those different factors, it creates quite a worrying scenario.”

    But he added that there were some projects on the ground that were helping to take the drug out of circulation.

    In Nepal, conservation groups were visiting pharmacies and clinics located within areas used by vultures and swapping supplies of diclofenac with a bird-friendly replacement, meloxicam.

    “This sort of thing might be possible in Nepal because it is a much smaller country than India and the problem is not as extensive,” he suggested.

    “But even then it is going to be a struggle because the range of these birds is so vast.”
    ……………………………………………………

    So we are not alone in the problem , the world has the same problem, are we going to take that as an advantage or are we gonna start dismantelling and disbandoning Zoroastrian system that were passed on to us.
    How can Zoroastrianism survive if Zorastrian Practises are being disbandened . How can something be what it is without its core.
    We have leaders who want to close down fundamental rites, open up the agiaries , sell of prime property that is capable of solving employment hurdles within the community , that can aid in further business development like the Parsi lying in Hospital
    Pessimism has taken over optimism on our leaders, is this a case of pessimism to suit certain groups!

  • rustom jamasji

    Can Dr Vibhu Prakash’s report on sucessfull vulture conservation projects be highlighted. Also one would like the report he submited for vulture aviary project at doongerwaadi to the BPP to be amde public!.
    Vultures are sucessfully bred in captivity all over the world including India.

  • Icchaporia.

    Mr. Khojeste Mistree has been holding the high office as Trustee of BPP and has completed 2 years in office but not a word has been heard on this topic.
    In fact I just read an article of Mr. Mistree penned a few years back before becoming the Trustee in which he has covered the views of High Priests underlining the need to streghthen the sysyem but funnily enough neither Mr. Mistree nor the High Priests have expresed anything about the delay in this sensitive issue.

  • phiroze

    Godrej Baug and the other surrounding Parsi owned buildings should be vacated and used for the breeding programe. Building these blocks for residential purpose was the biggest blunder of our past Trustees of BPP

  • Byram Sidhwa

    Dear Sir/Madam;
    It is easy to sway the electorate with false and impractical promises and stir up sentiments but when it comes to implementation such arm chair critics prove their mettle as any other man of straw. An inconvenient truth difficult to digest. The same guys who criticized earlier bunch of BPP Trustees can not deliver on tall promises to the simple minded folks on whose votes they rode piggy back to the Board Room st D.N. Road. Ar the time when they indulged in carping criticism of their predecessors, they never expected in their wildest dreams that they will have to lick what their own sputum.

  • R.Kayani.

    Phiroze has a valid point when he says that building Godrej Baug was the biggest blunder of past BPP Trustees. But Phiroze, instead of emtying these buildings,the present Trustees are constructing a multistoried Apartment building.
    So there is no difference between past Trustees and present ones except that middle class Parsis got flats in Godrej Baug but the new Multi storied building will have vacant flats of billionaire non resident Parsis.
    It will be indeed an achievement if Trustees having affiliation to WAPIZ can get a resolution for vacating all buildings in Godrej Baug.That will be the day when we can say that they are men of guts and have performed by what they promised before elections.Their inaction will prove likes of Byram Sidhwa right..

  • rustom jamasji
  • phiroze

    R Kayani,
    You are right there is no difference as far as the new construction at Godrej Baug.
    Can we not all unite and bring pressure on the present trustees in the interest of the religion. Infact all Parsis should stand for themselves and not depend on BPP. I have close relations staying at Godrej Baug and will take care of their alternate accomodation. Can Byram and others take care of one family each. Parsis whose name is charity have become a victim of charity. When you are dependant you open yourself to manipulation. This is one of the first thing my elders taught me.

  • R.Kayani.

    Phiroze,
    Charity housing per se is the root cause of laid back attitude amongst Parsees. Moreover I have no relations living in Godrej Baug. As for Byram or others let them answer your query.
    BPP Trustees have recently taken many decisions on their own. They can create alternate accommodation for all those presently living in Godrej Baug. In fact many buildings in Navroze Baug were meant to redeveloped as a poll promise but nothing has come out of it. Similarly a couple of buildings in Khareghat Colony can be redeveloped to accommodate those that will be displaced from Godrej Baug if Trustees are serious of Aviary Project. Do start a petition and I along with other humdeens will surely join in support. When we accuse others of ‘wasting time and money on court cases’ this is one cause all of us must espouse and file a court case against the Trustees to enforce their election promise from which they have quietly backed out.
    Those who are supporters and members of WAPIZ ought to question their elected representatives about their inaction.

  • R.Kayani.

    @ Mr.Jamasji,
    If writing articles and quoting news paper reports were treated as authentic and reliable then it is for persons like you who have been in the forefront on this sensitive topic to question those for whom you have expressed in the past admiration as to why they are reneging on what they promised at the time of elections.If merely making mention of newspaper reports was going to yield results then we would have attained a state of perfection . The Aviary could have at least been established by now if not fully functional. Do let all readers know the reasons why persons like you who penned long winding posts in 2007 are now keeping mum and not questioning those on whom you reposed immense faith and got them elected as custodians of our properties and faith.

  • R.Kayani.

    And Phiroze, I forgot to mention that neither you nor me are custodians of vast properties of the community. This is in reply to what you have remarked that all Parsees should stand for themselves and not depend on BPP. You and I can not start an Aviary since the property is neither vested in our control nor have we got the means or resources.As for housing yes I agree we should be self reliant as far as possible.

  • Zerxes.Dordi

    From:Zerxes,
    To: R. Jamasji,
    The relevance of your message of the 19th instant is read but not understood. Even three years back you have talked on the same subject. Is anybody here questioning the efficiency of the birds of prey. You are right on the dot in your 2007 post that Report of Dr Vibhu Prakash be made public. Yes it should be at least now since WAPIZ guys are occupying the seats of Trustees. Why the current Trustees specially WAPIZ representatives concealing the same. Can you answer?
    All that is being now said is the reluctance of even the current set of BPP Trustees to pursue the project which was shelved by the earlier set of BPP Trustees. Why the present lot can not come out with a statement of reasons for their inaction on this score? It is the idle criticism of earlier set of Trustees by a couple of persons who by chance got elected that is being poked at. So I wonder if anybody is interested in learning the attributes of the birds of prey when boarders here are talking of Trustees going back on their false claims in the not too distant past.

  • Urvax.Motafram

    Mr. JAMASJI.
    NOBODY IS QUESTIONING THE EFFICIENCY OF BIRDS OF PREY. WHAT IS BEING QUESTIONED IS THE ABSENCE OF GENUINE INTENT AND THE EFFICIENCY LEVEL OF THE TRUSTEE MATERIAL OCCUPYING THE HIGH OFFICE BUT SEIZED BY ADMINISTRATIVE PARALYSIS DESPITE THE FACT THAT THERE IS NO COURT CASE FILED ON THIS SUBJECT. IT IS BETRAYAL OF THE ELECTORAL MANDATE.PERSONS LIKE ME FEEL THAT WE WERE TAKEN FOR A RIDE WITH FALSE HOPES. THATS JUST IT.

  • phiroze

    We are once again falling into the trap of blame game. How is it going to help in solving this problem. It is precisely this that the enemies of our religion want and take advantage of. Can we not forget the past and look forward to solving this issue in a matured and responsible way.