Everyday Parsi: Ervad Jehangir Madon

Everyday Parsi: Ervad Jehangir Madon

Our seventh and last author of the 2015 Everyday Parsi series is Ervad Jehangir R. Madon Jehangir Madon writes August 1992, Bombay. 4:15 am. I would wake up to the constant reminders that it was already 4:30. My parents always did this, telling me and my brother that it was 15 minutes past the actual…

Everyday Parsi: Ervad Soli P. Dastur

Everyday Parsi: Ervad Soli P. Dastur

Our sixth author in the 2015 Everyday Parsi series is Ervad Soli P. Dastur A Mobed’s Recollections and Involvement in Muktad Gatha Days! On the P&O SS Oronsay ship somewhere near Suez Canal during the first part of August 1960, we some 20 or so J. N. Tata Endowment Scholars on our way to USA/UK…

Everyday Parsi: Ervad Vispi Jehangir Mirza

Our fifth author in the 2015 Everyday Parsi series is Ervad Vispi Jehangir Mirza 18 days of Muktad in Udvada Ervad Vispi Jehangir Mirza writes The preparations of Muktad started on Aspandad mahino and Aspandad roj, which was called Vis ma di nu Parabh. The marble tables with metal stands were brought out from the…

Everyday Parsi: Sheroo Vispi Kanga

Everyday Parsi: Sheroo Vispi Kanga

Our fourth author in the 2015 Everyday Parsi series is Sheroo Vispi Kanga Sheroo writes Thank you Parsi Khabar for giving me this opportunity to write about what the Muktad (free soul) days mean to me. The Muktad days for me are full of loving memories that are very special; it is a bitter sweet…

Everyday Parsi: Firoze Jungalwala

Everyday Parsi: Firoze Jungalwala

Our third author in the Everyday Parsi 2015 series is Dr. Firoze B. Jungalwala ­­My recollection of Muktad in Surat during the Late 1940s I vividly remember the Muktad days at my grand father’s home in Surat during the late 1940s, as a young boy. In those days, the muktad days were celebrated for 18…

Everyday Parsi: Niloufer Mavalvala

Everyday Parsi: Niloufer Mavalvala

Our second author for the 2015 Everyday Parsi Series is Niloufer Mavalvala Muktad Recollected: Then and Now Childhood memories can be sweet and not easily forgotten. I grew up in Karachi amongst a small community of 4000+ Zoroastrians. I remember my childhood being fun a one, of the happiest times of my life, and definitely…

Everyday Parsi: Ervad Kayomarz Yezdi Sidhwa

Everyday Parsi: Ervad Kayomarz Yezdi Sidhwa

Our first author for 2015 Everyday Parsi series is Ervad Kayomarz Yezdi Sidhwa. Kayomarz writes Thank you Parsi Khabar for giving me the opportunity to write what Muktad days have meant to my family and I. I grew up in a very conservative environment where both my parents are from Athornan families. My maternal side…

The Everyday Parsi in 2015

The Everyday Parsi in 2015

August 8, 2015 is the first day of Muktad or to call it correctly “Farvardegan” per the Shehanshahi Parsi Calendar. Parsis around the world and especially in India remember the dear departed of their family. Special prayers are offered at the Agiaries and in homes. The 10th day of the Muktad culminates into the Shehenshahi…

Everyday Parsi: Shernaz Petigara

  Our twelfth and final author in this year’s Everyday Parsi series Shernaz Petigara writes What do the Muktad days mean to me? When Parsi Khabar asked me to write on this topic, I just did not know how to react to it. With so many articles being written by scholars of our community, I…

Everyday Parsi: Fareeza Doctor

Our eleventh author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Fareeza Doctor writes For much of my life, the onset of August has meant the start of preparations for Humbandagi, and Mukhtad prayers, and of course one of the most auspicious days in the Zoroastrian calendar, Navroze. As kids we would wake up excitedly by 6am…

Everyday Parsi: Behroze A. Clubwala

Our tenth author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Behroze A. Clubwala writes The Muktads – traditions in India and an adaptation over the years in my home. I grew up in Madras, known today as Chennai, in the early fifties and sixties. There was a very small Parsi community, barely 100 families, tightly knit…

Everyday Parsi: Sanaya Pardiwalla

Our ninth author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Sanaya Pardiwalla writes As a Parsi, Muktad prayers have taken place in my family at different time points in my lifetime. I was under 3 years old when my grandpa Homi passed away. While I know that Muktad prayers were conducted at the Ranji Agiary at…

Everyday Parsi: Ervad Jimmy Doctor

Our eighth author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Ervad Jimmy Doctor writes Ever since I can remember, history has been one of my favorite subjects. It is only through history that we can value and understand the present, as well as realize the future. It was around the time that I became a Navar…

Everyday Parsi: Rayomand J. Patell

Our seventh author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Rayomand J. Patell writes I grew up in a fairly small, liberal family at Altamount Road, which meant i didn’t have too many Parsi friends while growing up whether around me in the area or at school. My experience with death was first brought home when…

Everyday Parsi: Kobad Zarolia

Our sixth author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Ervad Kobad Zarolia writes My impression more than memories would be the right title. I became Navar at the age of 11 and prayed as a hired Help at the age of 12 . I was hired by the Dader Agyari for 18 days performing ceremonies…

Everyday Parsi: Navroz N. Dabu

Our fifth author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Navroz N. Dabu writes   I have to confess that as a Child; I was not too enthusiastic, going to the Agiari or Atash Behram. Stark simplicity of the building exterior and interior as opposed to very expressive , ornamental architecture of Hindu & Jain temples…

Everyday Parsi: Neville Sorabji Gandhi

Our fourth author in the Everyday Parsi 2014Everyday Parsi 2014 series Neville Sorabji Gandhi writes My name is Neville Sorabji Gandhi.  I was born and graduated in Mumbai.  I am happily married to a Parsi and have a Teenaged Son. For the past few years I am employed in the UAE handling Finance & Administration.…

Everyday Parsi: Dolly Dastoor

Our third author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Dolly Dastoor writes Muktad, was the sweet fragrance l of pink roses which you had to hold carefully on your way to the agiary so as not to get pricked by the thorns. Muktad was the combined fragrance of flowers in silver vases and incense intermingled…

Everyday Parsi: Farzana Cooper

Our second author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Farzana Cooper writes I grew up in a middle class Parsi family in Mumbai which had a mix atmosphere. My father was a jovial man who followed no concept of religion and on the other hand my mother was a very religious god fearing noble soul…

Everyday Parsi: Sarosh J. Collector

Our first author in the Everyday Parsi 2014 series Sarosh J. Collector writes Muktad and what it has meant to me. Dear Parsi Khabar, I am humbled, that you have asked me to reflect on the Muktad days, and what they mean to me. Having grown up in Karachi, I remember the communal prayers that…

The Everyday Parsi in 2014

August 8, 2014 is the first day of Muktad or to call it correctly “Farvardegan” per the Shehanshahi Parsi Calendar. Parsis around the world and especially in India remember the dear departed of their family. Special prayers are offered at the Agiaries and in homes. The 10th day of the Muktad culminates into the Shehenshahi…

Everyday Parsi: Mahrukh Cama

Our eighth author in the Everyday Parsi Series Mahrukh Cama writes To this date, arrival of Fall reminds me of the muktad/gatha days when I was growing up in Karachi. While Muktad prayers took place in the two agiaris, the Parsi community met early morning for humbandagi at Jehangir Baug, a hall for navjotes, weddings…

Everyday Parsi: Rita Jamshed Kapadia

Our seventh author in the Everyday Parsi series. Rita Jamshed Kapadia writes: The sweet smell of flowers, the beautiful aroma of sandalwood and “loban”, the well laid out tables with “karasiyaas” and vases and the soothing chant of the ancient prayers recited by our Dastoorji – these are all wonderful memories of the “Muktad” days,…

Everyday Parsi: Perzen Patel

Our sixth author in the Everyday Parsi Series. Perzen Patel writes: Memories of Muktad and Gatha days The days of muktad and gathas have always been full of special memories for me. As a child, my earliest memories of these days were the availability of pretty sweet smelling flowers outside the agiary. I remember my…

Everyday Parsi: Shireen Palia

Our fifth author in the Everyday Parsi Series. Shireen Palia writes: I am Shireen Palia, a Clinical Psychologist working at a school for children with special needs, in Bombay. As I think back to what the Muktad days meant to me, memories of my childhood come to mind. Growing up in a small colony in…

Everyday Parsi: Shazneen Rabadi Gandhi

Our fourth author in the Everyday Parsi Series. Shazneen Rabadi Gandhi writes: A Personal Muktad My first memory of muktad is that of the one that followed my grand-uncle Sapal kaka’s death. That was the first death in my family that truly registered with me. He was a dear old man, who seemed to always…

Everyday Parsi: Khushnood Viccaji

Our next author in the Everyday Parsi series Khushnood Viccaji writes: I’m Khushnood Viccaji, staying in Mumbai, India with my wife and teenaged son. We are quite religious and traditional in our outlook, and like most Parsis we enjoy a healthy dose of fun, food and laughter. From childhood I’ve always associated the month of…

Everyday Parsi: Kaikhosrow Oshtori

Our second author in the Everyday Parsi Series. Kaikhosrow Oshtori writes: Dear Arzan, how nice and kind of you to think of me for your new project. I would love to participate and contribute my mite. But I have a slight problem. My parents never involved us with such things as Death and Muktad etc.…

Everyday Parsi: Naz Jokhi

Our first author in the Everyday Parsi Series. Naz Jokhi writes: I am Nazneen Jokhi living currently in Copenhagen with my 10 month old son and husband Shahzad Jokhi. My husband and I both are devout Parsees and love globetrotting as and when opportunity arises. For me Muktad is the 10 day period where we…

The Everyday Parsi

Today is the first day of the Muktad. Over the next 10 and 18 days, Parsis around the world and especially in India remember the dear departed of their family. Special prayers are offered at the Agiaries and in homes. The 10th day of the Muktad culminates into the Shehenshahi Parsi New Year. This year…